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The X-Pro2: 24 Hours In


Some very early thoughts on the X-Pro2 I picked up yesterday. The photos are OOC jpegs taken with a Fuji 35mm (50mm equivalent) f2; I have the raw files but it is late and Adobe don't want me to be able to open them for some reason - I'll figure it out at some point but for now, sorry - jpegs only. And not the most fascinating of pictures but never mind - some blindingly beautiful work will no doubt follow later in the week... ;-)


Shot in Velvia mode and downsized in Photoshop; no post-processing. A bit orange-heavy? Perhaps - the late evening sunlight was very warm though, and my Nikons give similar results. Shot at 1 stop under.


Shot in standard mode then de-hazed in Photoshop and contrast given a bit of a boost. Emsmallened on output. Lots of dust visible all over the sensor, despite my only having taken the camera and the 35mm f2 out of their packaging and married them. Ah well. More concerning were a number of tiny black spots visible in the blue of the dusk sky. Dead pixels? Not sure. But there were quite a few of them. 

First thoughts - the cons: 

1. Battery life - as bad as you've heard. Carry three or four per camera if you are out photographing a wedding with a couple of these. I've been through one already and I've only shot about 150 photos - that said, I've been fiddling with the camera a lot of course, and I've heard it said that batteries get a bit more efficient over their first few charging cycles (how true this is I have no idea) so take these thoughts with a pinch of salt. 
2. In my (medium sized) hands the camera isn't that easy to hold. The weight is a delight but the buttons on the grip are not - you'll be pressing them repeatedly when you are simply walking around. Still, you'll be needing to turn it off when not up to your eye so get used to powering down: by doing this, accidentally pressing the Q or AF-L buttons and changing settings shouldn't happen too often (!). Maybe a firmware update will allow you to disable the buttons (and yes, I know that the camera's settings can be locked but I've not had it long  enough yet to figure out if that is the way to go - I'm not sure I want to be fiddling about trying to reset something that is locked; more when I have a clue). 
3. The EVF isn't that accurate - your pictures won't look like what you're seeing on the screen though given time I guess you'll become adept at translation of one into the other. At least I'm hoping so. 

First thoughts - the pros: 

1. It looks beautiful. Really. But then you already know that. The weight, the beauty and the metal construction mean that I want to pick it up and use it. I know, I know - you've read that a zillion times - tell you something you don't know? But it is true - I couldn't resist a short walk this evening just to try it out like a Pokemon Go addict. 
2. The shutter sound. Geeky or not, I love how it sounds. It sounds like money. Or engineering. I've heard the same thing said about the sound of a Mercedes door closing and if I were into cars maybe that would be a parallel I could legitimately draw. As it is, it's a guess. 
3. The focussing - my biggest concern before I plonked down the wonga - has so far proved a revelation - unfussy, easy to navigate, sharp each time. Mind you, I'm not a fan of focus tracking / continuous autofocus and reviews elsewhere have suggested this is unusable so if this is your preferred way of working you might want to reconsider; again, though, I can't comment with any authority. But single shot autofocus seems delightful. I've not tried manual focus so again, no comment. 
4. Did I mention the weight? Not too light, not too heavy (at least with the 35mm) - Goldilocks weight. 
5. The menu design / layout seems to have improved immensely since the X100 - more intuitive and items seem easier to get to, though this may be a product of the fact that I'm not coming to the camera cold and have some experience of the way the Fuji designers have thought about this aspect of their cameras in the past. 


So, anyway, time for bed. I'll be back with more nonsense soon no doubt, and perhaps then with the ability to process raw files, Adobe-willing. 

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