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What?

You think this blog and the photographs here are all over the shop? You're right. No themes, a big ol' mess of pottage. Portraits, actors, gardens, family, weddings, kids, seascapes, cats, dogs, bishbashbosh. All over the shop. Well, wait 'til you see my notebooks. Only, of course, they are objects, so you won't. But let me tell you, if you think these pages and pages of non-linear posts, these styleless ramblings are random, honest, the notebooks are "worse". Or better. Whatevs. I'm tending towards the better nowadays, in part because to hell with it, so I don't have a "style", I haven't found my "voice" and I no longer care. No one gives a monkey's dinkum so why should I? Look for example, here's something from my latest notebook:


The underlying pictures are by Stephen Shore - I have no idea what they are about, what they mean, other than perhaps they are somehow meant to represent pure seeing - that is to say, recreating the act of seeing a scene without consciousness of the camera as a device for translation. Anyway. It was meant to be an homage, paean, to Peter Beard, until I found out what a dipstick he was by listening to an interview with him. So now the above is left drifting with nowhere to go, with only the viewer able to impute some meaning to it, to graft something on post hoc. Good luck with that.  I guess I can't wholly remove the PB references though, but just remember - once done with admiration, there's none of that now.
One other thing: before you judge, remember, you need to see the original to truly make your mind up - in context and in the flesh it makes some sort of sense.

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From Wikipedia:

Waltércio Caldas Júnior (born 6 November 1946), also known as Waltércio Caldas, is a Brazilian sculptor, designer, and graphic artist. Caldas is best known as part of Brazil's Neo-Concretism movement as well as for his eclectic choices in materials.