Skip to main content

1922 (Warning: A bit sweary).

I'm not on the best of moods at the moment - tired and mardy. And one of the things annoying me is that, in terms of lighting for cameras, we're virtually living in Edwardian times. Look at all this shit:



All I wanted was a portable softbox, nothing difficult. But I had to spend £130 to get a shit-list of heavy duty crap that I have to haul around and put together like the sort of tent that Jerome K. Jerome would have recognised. Hello?! It's 2017 - minute round black screws that will get lost the second time they are used are not needed. Steel knitting needles like tiny tent poles that you have to force into a piece of round plastic with the attendant risk of ripping the reflector / cutting open your palms are not needed. Flimsy horrible black nylon bags with velcro fastenings are not needed - what IS all this crap? Have you been to a festival in the last 25 years? HERE'S A CONCEPT FOR YOU, ELINCHROM: POP UP TENTS. They're a thing, they have been for decades. You don't use frigging poles any more, you don't risk injury putting the tent up. Plus the thing is so cheap you can leave it behind at the end of the festival. If your pricing structure were applied to camping people would buy original Airstream trailers just to go to Bestival. Come on, design some easy to use modifiers, reasonably cheap - otherwise I'll have to.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Sia Sumana opening night, We Are Cuts, Soho

Photography as Art

Having spent Friday night in prison in Oxford I wanted to recuperate a little yesterday and so took the time to visit the Ansel Adams exhibition at Oxford's modern art museum. Now, back when I were a nipper during my phirst phase of photographic interest, between the ages of about 18 and 25 (before the Exeter sojourn and the heavy-duty clubbing period thereafter), I remember I loved his work. However, since then, sadly, a more cynical Patrick held sway for a while (cynicism, for a long while, being my idea of sophistication) and I rather went off his pictures, or at least, the idea of his pictures. It seemed to me that everyone who had even the remotest interest in photography cited Adams as a key influence and criticism of him appeared off-limits. During this time I wasn't even sure that photography was an art, and that Adams couldn't be as good as I'd thought because he earned near universal praise for his work (I know, strange distorted thinking, but that's how …

Waltercio Caldas

Portrait taken at Cecilia Brunson Project, Bermondsey.

From Wikipedia:

Waltércio Caldas Júnior (born 6 November 1946), also known as Waltércio Caldas, is a Brazilian sculptor, designer, and graphic artist. Caldas is best known as part of Brazil's Neo-Concretism movement as well as for his eclectic choices in materials.